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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. th
forces claiming to have targeted 100 gaza sites. the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton is on her way to the middle east for talks with officials in a bid to try to end the deadly crisis. we've been watching oil prices, as well. and after sharp gains yesterday, you can see oil prices pulling back about 27 cents, still just about $89 for wti crude. we will have a live report from our nbc colleagues on the ground in the middle east coming up in the next half hour. >>> let's talk about some of the main market events of the morning. actually today fed chairman ben bernanke's speech at the economics sclub of new york is coming up at 12:15 eastern time. traders will be listening no any comments on the central bank's operation twist program and discussions about changing how the fed communicates about interest rates. operation twist expires next month. and there is some speculation the fed will continue making asset purchases by expanding the size of its $40 billion a month quantitate of it easing program. also on the economic agenda today, october housing starts released at 8:30 a.m. an
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new rsey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding f the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 peopl
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
phenomenal work. tuesday's election brought us not just a second term for president obama but a new congress as well. there are two ways to look at the make up of the congress. one is the endorsement of the status quo. asking the two to work together as house speaker john boehner put it the day after the election. >> the american people have spoken. they reelected president obama. they have again reelected a republican majority in the house of representatives. if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, it's a mandate for us to find a way to work together on the solutions to the challenges we all face as a nation. >> the other way to interpret the results is to see them as a resounding liberal governance. a larger and apparently more democratic majority in the senate. it's how harry reid framed the results. >> we had an overwhelming re-election of the president. we picked up seats in the senate and the house. it's not the status quo. >> one thing is clear. it will not look like any congress we have ever had. the most stunning exacten is the diminishing number of white men in house of repres
in recent days. up here in north gaza, close to the frontier with israel, people are used to the airstrikes that come, the craters that pockmark the countryside and that destroy their buildings. let's face, it's happened now every few years. so when you come here, you'll find a sense of relief and immediate happiness, of course, but people are pretty skeptical about whether the peace will last. >> ( translated ): god willing i hope it holds but i'm 50/50. they've been breaking their promises since the prophet's day. >> reporter: mobility scooter meets hamas flag. ahmed atah lost both legs in the last israeli invasion. so, will a ceasefire become a peace? "it could," he said, "but first we need to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the
to consumers using mobile devices. shoppers spent more than $1 billion. is this the sign we've been waiting for that the economy is finally on the mend? we're going to ask a guy who just might be the best investor ever to walk this earth. how is that for an introduction. >> pretty good. >> warren buffett, glad to have you here. >> all right. an important health warning. if you've having a grapefruit or grapefruit juice for breakfast this morning, it can have serious, even fatal side effects, if you're using certain medications. dr. nancy snyderman will be here to explain that. >> a lot of medications take. like mother, like daughter. anna nicole smith's little girl is modeling for the clothing brand guess just like her mother did. we'll have more on that story. >>> we're also going to tell you about a recent health scare for oprah winfrey. >> we want to begin with cyber monday, big success. diana alvear is live from phoenix at the amazon.com fulfillment center. good morning to you. >> reporter: lots of happy faces on the floor this morning. now that it's clear the consumers were out in full
. jason brooks with kcbs and cbsmoneywatch.com joins us now and is it all politics or is business at play as well, jason? >> reporter: we have a number of issues sinking the stock market today. it's one of the worst days for the market in 2012. there are election issues at play, as well. we have sectors that are under pressure from regulatory concerns, namely financial, also energy. but then i have healthcare sector doing well since romney won't be able to invalidate obamacare. there is the looming fiscal crisis and the partisanship that's prevailing up until this election, worries that congress and the white house won't be able to solve that looming fiscal crisis. but another big issue really sinking the market today is europe. we have a downgrade from the european union on growth prospects in europe for this year. and it's looking like the recession could last all the way through next year. you're looking at riots in greece. greece has been a big issue all the way across. we're also hearing problems that germany's economy is getting worse. germany is the economic driver in europe. this
as the community to figure out what we should be prioritizing to make sure we still have a college that is useful for our san franc sicifr. >> they've been able to balance the school budget, eliminate in deficiencies and meet the needs. >> we are still very dependent on the state. we can't change our tuition. we can only look to operate more efficiently, build enrollment and make sure every dollar we get is spent in the classroom and on student services. >> reporter: now, the college trustees seem to be very confident they can save the institution. their next big test will be in march when they have to show the accrediting commission all the progress they've made. passing the resolutions will definitely help in that regard. >> thank you, arturo. prop 30 wasn't the only good news for governor brown. a democratic super majority in both houses of the state legislature will likely provide support for many of his programs, if not all. in theory, this will allow democrats to pass budgets and other spending issues without any republican support. this marks the first time since 1965 the democrats will ha
speaker boehner. harry reid said, you can't push us around, we'll tax the rich. richard thumb came in we want to preserve medicare, medicaid, social security and we don't care about the deficit. you add that up, tax now, promise to cut later, ignore the deficit. that could be the outlines of a fiscal cliff deal. bill: be clear on that now. speaker boehner before the election last week. what he is saying, there is big distinction here now, you can raise revenue but don't touch the tax rates. >> yeah. bill: how would you do that? >> okay, you could do that by cutting some loopholes. obviously, with this new administration, you're not going to get tax rates cut. that was the romney plan, to raise revenues. so you could eliminate some loopholes, deductions, for example, as a way of bringing in more tax revenue. but you're right, bill, there is a key distinction between tax rates and raising revenues by cutting loopholes. bill: give me an example. what would that deduction be? >> suppose you narrow the mortgage interest deduction, just suppose, that is not necessarily on the table, just suppo
with us (male announcer): live from the bay area this is the kron 4 morning news. kron 4 news at 4:00 a.m. start now. >> good morning it is wednesday november 21, 2012. some parts of the bay are waking up to rain falling overnight as we are one day away from thanksgiving. good morning i am james fletcher. >> and i am annie. this is the biggest travel day of the year. let us start with the weather and a busy travel day. erica is standing by with the weather. good morning erica. >> good morning to you both. storm tracker 4 is showing where the rain is currently sitting you see our live russell sweeps going throughsweeps going through. >> cannot be surprised if you run into some puzzling yellow on your screen indicates moderate rainfall north of benicia highway 4 approaching to 42 and heading to interstate 680. in walnut creek we are seeing wet weather on the freeway but for the surrounding streets also. sequoia avenue, pleasant hill road we are contending with wet weather there. as we turn to the mid peninsula we are catching a dry break for the eastern end of the san mateo bridge. it is
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. d. this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automatic spending cuts would begin to bite-- 10% less for defense in 2013 and an 8% cut in domestic programs. t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)